News & Blog

Sign up to our newsletter for all the latest pet related news both locally and Australia wide.
Google Maps location for South Cranbourne Veterinary Surgery

South Cranbourne Veterinary Surgery
82 Earlston Cct (Cnr South Gippsland Hwy)
Cranbourne
Victoria 3977

Phone:
03 5995 1451
Fax:
03 5995 1447

1 2 3 47

Idexx-Catalyst.jpg

We are excited to announce that we have just upgraded our in-clinic laboratory to the most advanced in-clinic blood testing machines. The machines are produced by Idexx Laboratories who are the world leader in veterinary laboratory testing. The blood testing machines come with Idexx Laboratories full support and quality assurance to accurately give Laboratory quality results rapidly in the clinic without sending them off site to their Laboratory.

0 comments | Read the full post

dog and horse

This year we’ve seen multiple cases of injuries to puppies relating to interactions with horses. This includes puppies being stood on by horses and even getting scared and running into electric fences. Given the sheer size and weight of a horse, choosing to take your puppy around horses can be an extremely dangerous situation if not handled correctly.

0 comments | Read the full post

OldCat

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of one or more joints. Damage within the joint results in inflammation that causes decreased mobility and pain. As the signs of arthritis can be exacerbated by cold weather, many people start to notice changes in their pets due to arthritis as the weather begins to cool down. Signs to watch out for that may indicate that your pet has debilitating arthritis pain include

0 comments | Read the full post

Tyrice Trim 2

Tyrice, a two-and-a-half-year-old Domestic Short Hair cat was brought into the clinic after his owners found him collapsed and unable to move. Tyrice has access to both indoors and outdoors and lives in a known snake area, so a snake bite was our number one concern.

0 comments | Read the full post

Rabbit Calicivirus

rabbit

There are a number of strains of the Rabbit Calicivirus (RHDV) present in Australia. The original virus RHDV1 was released in Australia in 1995 to help control wild rabbit populations. The virus itself most commonly causes sudden death in rabbits without apparent clinical signs. In some cases infected rabbits may have a fever, are lethargic, off food and bleeding from the mouth or nose. A new strain of Calicivirus will be released around Australia in the first week of March. Now is the best time to ensure that your pet bunny is protected.

0 comments | Read the full post

1 2 3 47